Welcome, visitor! [ Register | Login

Owen Guns Bulletin Dec 08 No 6

Bulletin November 29, 2008

Welcome to the Sixth Edition of the Owen Guns Bulletin.

STOP PRESS

We are currently publishing another new firearm photographic site at
www.Gun-Photos.com

Scroll down for another Free Firearm Manual

We are currently publishing our new website at www.owenguns.com

Where we are in the process of listing 1000s of rifles,shotguns, handguns, accessories, and gun parts that we have for sale. Visit the website now. We also have shooting articles and important firearm information for the gun enthusiast.

Take away free gun photos and free firearm images for your gun gallery collection. New firearm related material being added every day.

Any Enquiries on any products phone 07 54824099 or 07 54825070

Monthly Specials

Ideal Christmas Present for Dad, An Adult Air Rifle. Practice Target Shooting in the Garage.

Includes a 3-9×40 Variable Air Rifle Scope and Air Rifle Mounts. $385.00

(Have to be shock resistant for High powered Air Rifles) . These products will all be 20 % dearer as Distributor prices went up 1st December due to dollar.

The single shot, .177 cal. spring air Genesis pellet rifle features ultra hi-tech ergonomics in its soft, synthetic pistol style grip and sculpted cheek piece. 28 pounds of cocking force gets up to 1000 fps. Other features include:

• Two stage adjustable trigger
• Ventilated rubber recoil pad
• Precision rifled steel barrel
• Crosblock® trigger blocking mechanism
• Ambidextrous safety
• Made in the USA.

Winchester Rifle Cases Model 7808 Lightweight Metal Alloy Cases.

Double Rifle Case. (no wheels model)

$135.

Leupold 3-9×40 Variable Rifle Scope

$349.

plus registered Post.

Only until Stocks last due to the stronger US Dollar. Last year we had to pay $600 for one of these. Leupold, the Leading Scope in accuracy and reliability. The new ones we are importing now are 20% more than last months unless the US dollar crashes again prices will be up next month again, so buy now or pay more.

——————————————————-

These Rimfire rifles produced by Ceska Zbrojovka Uhersky Brod are among the most sought-after firearms in the world.

The CZ 452 featuring beechwood stock without checkering, hammer forged barrel with tangent iron sights and simple adjustable trigger.

The Famous BRNO 22.

$579.

The CZ 452 actions are manufactured from steel billets not tubing or plastic, the barrels are hammer forged for accuracy and long life. The trigger is adjustable for weight, and the safety is located above the rear of the bolt and provides a positive firing pin block. Single shot adapters, 5 round magazines and 10 round magazines are available for this line of rimfire rifles.

Bushnell Sportsman 3-9×40 Variable Riflescope at a once only price of………….

$90.00

plus Postage

RCBS Great Prices, Get the Best Reloading Tools for the Lowest Price.


The Rock Chucker Supreme Reloading Press

$220.

plus post

EMAIL Or PHONE 0754824099

For More RED HOT PRICES

EMAIL Or PHONE 0754824099


GUN Law FACTS

Guns Ended Feudal Slavery and Preserves Civilisation.

Human beings only have two ways to deal with one another: Reason and Force.

If you want me to do something for you, you have a choice of either convincing me via argument, or force me to do your bidding under threat of force. Every human interaction falls into one of those two categories, without exception. Reason or force, that’s it.

In a truly moral and civilised society, people exclusively interact through persuasion. Force has no place as a valid method of social interaction, and the only thing that removes force from the menu is the personal firearm, as paradoxical as it may sound to some.

When I carry a gun, you cannot deal with me by force. You have to use reason and try to persuade me, because I have a way to negate your threat or employment of force. The gun is the only personal weapon that puts a 100-pound woman on equal footing with a 220-pound mugger, a 75-year old retire’e on equal footing with a 19-year old body builder, and a wheelchair bound individual on equal footing with a carload of drunks with baseball bats. The gun removes the disparity in physical strength, size, or numbers between a potential attacker and a defender.

This Lady would not get mugged.

This Lady would not get mugged.

There are plenty of people who consider the gun as the source of bad force equations. These are the people who think that we’d be more civilised if all guns were removed from society, because a mugger with a firearm makes the job safer for muggers. That, of course, is only true if the mugger’s potential victims are mostly disarmed either by choice or by legislative statute. It has no validity when most of a mugger’s potential marks are armed. Of course that is all okay until the anti -gunner gets mugged at gun point and finally understands that even when he hands over his valuables, the mugger might just kill him anyway to get rid of a witness.

People who argue for the banning of arms ask for automatic rule, by the young, the strong, and the many, and that’s the exact opposite of a civilised society. A mugger, even an armed one, can only make a successful living in a society where the State has granted him a monopoly on force.

Then there’s the argument that the gun makes confrontations lethal that otherwise would only result in injury. This argument is fallacious in several ways. Without guns involved, confrontations are won by the physically superior party inflicting overwhelming injury on the loser.
People who think that fists, bats, beer bottles, fence paling’s, sticks, or stones don’t constitute lethal force watch too much TV, where people take beatings and come out of it with a bloody lip at worst. The fact that the gun makes lethal force easier, works solely in favour of the weaker defender, not the stronger attacker. If both are armed, the field is level. The gun is the only weapon that’s as lethal in the hands of an octogenarian as it is in the hands of a weightlifter. It simply wouldn’t work as well as a force equaliser if it wasn’t both lethal and easily employable.

When I carry a gun, I don’t do so because I am looking for a fight, but because I’m looking to be left alone. The gun at my side means that I cannot be forced, only persuaded. I don’t carry it because I’m afraid, but because it enables me to be unafraid. It doesn’t limit the actions of those who would interact with me through reason, only the actions of those who would do so by force. It removes force from the equation…and that’s why carrying a gun is a civilised act in a civilised country. Civilisation respects its citizens. On the opposite basis in a despotic country the un armed slave depends on the clemency of the tyranny and he has no value to society and his death would not diminish or count more than this full stop.

………………………………

Gun History

Guns and Steel

Part Three

Sir Joseph Whitworth, BART.,

C.E., F.R.S., LL.D., D.C.L.

Report By The Ordnance Select Committee

On the 26th of November, 1862, the Ordnance Select Committee published the following results of a series of trials made with the Whitworth and Enfield rifles.

The dimensions and constructions of the two rifles are stated below, the mean angle of elevation for a given range is tabulated, and also the mean radial deviation, or figure of merit. The experiments were instituted by the Secretary of State for War in the year 1861.

ENFIELD:-

Diameter of bore 0.577in.
Pitch of rifling, 1 turn in 78ins.
No. of grooves 3

WHITWORTH:-

Diameter across angles, 0.490in.
Diameter across flats, 0.451in.

Pitch of rifling, 1 turn in 20ins.
No. of grooves Hexagon.

Action of a Whitworh Rifle, provision for Tang Site but it is not fitted.

Action of a Whitworh Rifle, provision for Tang Site but it is not fitted.

  ENFIELD WHITWORTH
Range
Yards
Mean Radial
Deviation
Mean
Angle
Mean Radial
Deviation
Mean
Angle
  inches   inches  
300 12.69 0° 44′ 8″ 3.86 0° 56′ 49″
500 19.80 1° 45′ 13″ 7.29 1° 23′ 37″
800 41.61 2° 46′ 6″ 15.67 2° 17′ 6″
1,000 95.01 4° 3′ 33″ 23.13 3° 5′ 36″
1,200 133.53 5° 9′ 48″ 46.92 4° 3′ 6″

The Henry And Metford Rifles

I here confine myself to pointing out the manner in which my system has been followed in the construction of the Henry and Metford rifles. The drawing shows in section the bore of each gun, as well as the respective bullets.

The Henry rifle has a polygonal bore with seven instead of six sides.

The diameter of a circle touching each flat side of the polygon is .45 of an inch; the maximum diameter of the grooving is .457 of an inch.

The bullet is 2.93 diameters in length.

The twist of the rifling is 1 turn in 22 inches.

When the bullet moulds itself to the form of the rifling, each angular point is cut away by the seven projecting sharp edges which protrude in the barrel at the junction of the sides of the polygon.

This alteration in the rifling of my barrel was no doubt done in order to meet the requirements of a cylindrical hardened lead bullet, which cannot be much upset by the powder. It may be very well for match shooting when in good order. The difference between the maximum and minimum diameters is small, and the amount of upsetting required by the bullet is proportionately less but the use of a steel bullet is rendered impracticable, and the rifling is unsuited for the great wear and tear of a military weapon.

Regarded as a military arm, the additions to my barrel above referred to have nullified its efficiency.

I was the first to use a hardened bullet, but I made it the shape of the barrel, and obtained a mechanical fit, which enabled me to use a steel or any other hardened bullet.

The alteration of the twist from 1 turn in 20 inches to 1 turn in 22 inches, must have been made purely for the sake of alteration. I had found it requisite to go from 1 turn in 78 inches of the Enfield to 1 turn in 20 inches. If the steel bullet is to be considered a matter of importance, I should prefer I turn in 17 inches, because steel requires a higher rotation than lead on account of its less specific gravity.

The Metford rifle has a bore of a cylindrical character. It is made up of a series of cylindrical portions concentric with the axis of the bore, and alternating in size. This provides a series of grooves, five in number, and cylindrical in section, with sharp sloping edges.

The maximum diameter is .47 of an inch, the minimum diameter being .462 of an inch.

The bullet is 3.02 diameters in length.

The barrel is rifled with an increasing twist, commencing at the breech end with 1 turn in 48 inches, and terminating at the muzzle with 1 turn in 16 inches.

It will be remembered that in the Whitworth rifle the bore is hexagonal, the mean diameter is .47 of an inch, the bullet is 3 diameters in length, and the twist of the rifling is 1 turn in 20 inches.

Hexagonal Rifling

I have stated that the form of the bore of the Whitworth rifle is polygonal, being a hexagon with rounded edges; it is therefore a combination of a straight line and a circle, and its surfaces are those most easily produced in the workshop.

There is a geometrical simplicity pertaining to the polygonal form which is unattainable by any other form.

The amount of bearing surface for giving rotation, and which also conduces to the centreing of the shot, depends upon the difference between the maximum and minimum diameters of the bore, this difference, in fact, represents the hold which the barrel has upon the projectile. In any grooved system of rifling you pass more rapidly from the maximum to the minimum diameter, and the extent of bearing surface is diminished accordingly, whereas in the hexagonal system, there is a long inclined bearing surface, the section of which is a straight line starting from the minimum diameter and running into a circle at the end of the maximum diameter.

Muzzle of a Whitworth Rifle

Muzzle of a Whitworth Rifle

A polygonal rifled projectile is applicable to the largest cannon as well as to small arms, and I have adopted the hexagonal form, because it gives me the best working difference between the maximum and minimum diameters.

It will be observed that the hexagonal form of the projectile is analogous to that of the hexagonal nut universally used.

It may be said that this record of my experiments, showing how the modern rifle has become what it is in range, in penetration, and in accuracy, has ceased to be of interest or importance since the new element of rapid firing has been brought to bear with such important results by the introduction of breech loading. I would state in reply that breech loading and rapid fire give increased importance and value to range, penetration, and accuracy, as the primary and essential qualities of the rifle. However necessary these qualities may have been for the muzzle-loader, they are still more requisite with an arm which must otherwise waste its ammunition. Rapid firing must rest on the very best system of rifling, as its only safe basis

————————————————————————————–

FREE FOR ELECTRONIC DOWNLOAD

M-11/Nine Cobray Operation and Maintenance Manual

Email : OwenGuns@spiderweb.com.au and it will be sent to you in .pdf format free of charge.

_________________________________________________________________________________________________

To subscribe to this newsletter add your email address to the Newsletter sign up field in the right menu column.

To enquire about any product in our newsletter or website, send an email to

owenguns@spiderweb.com.au

_________________________________________________________________________________________________

This Newsletter is published by Owen Guns 24 McMahon Road, Gympie

Ph: 07 5482 5070

If you no longer wish to receive the newsletter, click Unsubscribe to have your email address automatically removed from our email list.

Leave a Reply

You must be logged in to post a comment.